Archive: June 2017
The Dreaded Infodump

I had a young writer ask me for advice on how to weave exposition into her fantasy story. The “infodump” is a hurdle for every worldbuilding storyteller. Readers need to know certain things about the world, but they don’t want to be bogged down with endless exposition. I figured my answer might be worth posting here …

The main rule is: Don’t ever give the reader information until the reader wants information. Manipulation is your friend here. Tease the reader with the possibility of a answer and then cut that answer short. It helps if your hero is in the exact same position of ignorance as the reader, because then they can become a proxy for the reader’s frustration. Make the hero FIGHT for answers so that when she finally gets them, it’s a kind of victory. And even when you do explain something, don’t explain everything. Tell just enough to keep the story moving forward. Because at the end of the day, that’s the exact amount of info that the reader wants (and not a word more). Another trick, always make sure that your “answers” generate even bigger questions … thus putting the reader back on the hook.
Consider the first Harry Potter book. Re-read those first fifty pages and you see how brilliantly Rowling manipulates readers. The first Hogwarts acceptance letter shows up at the Dursleys, and we’re mildly curious what it might be. But then the letter is destroyed before we can read it! As is the next letter, and the next … It’s not until page fifty-five(!) that Hagrid tells us that Harry is a wizard. By the time we read that actual letter, readers are practically drooling.
There’s a lot more to say on this subject, but the above is a good place to start!
My Favorite Book of 2017 …

This month, a remarkable children’s book was released into the world. I’ve been a fan or Laurel Snyder’s writing for many years, but her latest book Orphan Island is on a different level. This is the sort of book that keeps other authors up at night. It’s THAT GOOD.

A summary from Goodreads:

On the island, everything is perfect. The sun rises in a sky filled with dancing shapes; the wind, water, and trees shelter and protect those who live there; when the nine children go to sleep in their cabins, it is with full stomachs and joy in their hearts. And only one thing ever changes: on that day, each year, when a boat appears from the mist upon the ocean carrying one young child to join them—and taking the eldest one away, never to be seen again.

I was asked to provide a blurb for the back cover of the book. Here’s what I said: “Orphan Island is a masterpiece—both timeless and immediate. Snyder’s book, like the island within it, contains all of the joys, wonders, and terrors of childhood. Every young reader needs this book; every grown reader needs it even more.”

GO READ IT!