Easter Traditions …

Mary and I are orphans here in Los Angeles.  For the last few years, we’ve taken shelter each Easter with some kindhearted relatives.  These relatives are big fans of games and such, and so last year, they initiated a holiday tradition of doing dollar-store crafts.  We began with paint-by-numbers.  As some of you may recall, I have a low tolerance for toys that require patience or instruction-reading.1  So in order to keep myself interested in such projects, I have to add a few personal touches.  Here’s what I came up with last year.  It’s a landscape entitled Dragon and Valley, a Study:

The more observant among you will notice that the above painting has a frame around it.  That’s because it is Art, ladies and gentlemen.  Art that currently hangs on the wall of my office.  And, as of yesterday afternoon, it will be kept company by another addition to the oeuvre.

This year, I decided to tackle the art of engraving (on holographic foil, no less!).2  The task took many hours, and when the flimsy metal “scraper thingy” became worn down to a nub, I turned to a 120v Dremel electric engraver to finish the job.3   While traces of my earlier style are still present, I think you’ll agree that my technique has grown to accommodate my conceptual ambitions.

 

Without further ado, I present HoloShark with Easter Bunny:

You’re welcome, Art World.  See you next year.


  1. Mary and I are very different in this regard. While she could do puzzles all day long, I can only sit down at a puzzle long enough to … hey look, cartoons!”
  2. The holographic foil is why the image looks funny (like any good artist, I blame all flaws on the materials).
  3. This is true — my uncle has the best tool shed ever.